Do You Need A Six-Figure Income?

The term, “Six-figure income” or, “I’m making six figures a year” is so popular these days. There are even courses aimed to help you earn a six-figure income. Some of these are terrific courses and I’m even taking one to elevate my business.

But why is the six-figure goal so important and enticing for us? Do you need to promise a six-figure result for your clients to be able to sell products? Do you even need a six-figure income to run a home studio or an online business?

The questions are many

The questions are many

What if there was a course aimed to help you earn $50,000 a year for your business, studio or freelance career?

If you are starting out that might be a more realistic and achievable idea to reach before you aim for the six figures.

Author and business owner, Ramit Sethi, says this about earning a six-figure income,

“It can be the golden milestone, the badge of honour showing to the world that you made it and have now claimed your fat slice of the American Dream.

You can save more. Invest more. And most importantly, spend more. Once you start earning six figures, you’re a “high earner.” You get the velvet rope treatment and enter a club with other high earners basking in your newfound echelon of society.”
— Ramit Sethi

Of course, he is right on the fact that it can feel like a “badge of honour” and that “you made it”.

But what if you don’t need to earn a six-figure income to feel like you have made it? Maybe you live in a smaller town and “only” need a 5 figure income? Does that make you less of a success than a six-figure earner?

I think the best way is to define what success means to you. Maybe that is earning a six-figure income from your studio or freelance business. Perhaps you need much less to feel like a success. Let me know in the comments what you feel like.

Perhaps my point of view is stemming from that I didn’t grow up in the USA, nor the UK, but in a small town in Sweden. There we didn’t strive for the American Dream or that you have to make a certain amount to be successful.

I’m not trying to dispute the hard work it takes to earn a six-figure income or the success and satisfaction you can feel from making it, I’m just trying to question the obsession we have with it.

Let me know in the comments what you think. Do you agree or disagree?

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